Posts Tagged: "visual merchandising company"

Key retail visual merchandising terms every retailer needs to know

The world of visual merchandising could be very confusing with a lot of specific terminology. If you have ever wondered what certain terms actually mean in the retail and visual merchandising world, we have compiled the definitions of some of the commonly used terms.

Basic Visual Merchandising Terms:

  • Merchandising – using effective presentation techniques to entice customers to purchase products.
  • Fixtures – Shelving, cabinets, tables, rods, counters, stands, easels, forms, and platforms on which merchandise is stocked and displayed for sale in the shop.
  • Optimise – planning, implementing and reviewing steps to improve the likelihood of a purchase being made.
  • Inventory – The items for sale in your store.
  • Layout – The way in which your store is laid out, and how the products are arranged for sale.
  • ROI – Acronym for Return on Investment. This is a way of working out if the money you are investing is profitable.
  • Consumer – a person who purchases goods and services for personal use, or the decision maker for business purchases.
  • POP/POS – This stands for Point of Purchase/Point of Sale. The place where the transaction is complete (and a great place to put impulse products!)

More Advanced Visual Merchandising Terms:

  • Themes – This is the topic of your display. It should represent the message you would like to convey to the shoppers. Consider the way that your products are used, and build your theme around that.
  • Planogram – Shortened to POG, this is a visual representation of the products and services in your shop. Planogram is essentially a model that indicates the best positioning and placement of your merchandise.
  • Hot Spot – A place that customers gravitate to in your store. Place your most profitable items here.
  • Props – Objects added that support the theme of the display. These items are used for building ambience and theme in your shop; they would not be for sale.
  • Sightlines – a line of vision from someone’s eye to what should be seen (determining good or bad visibility). Good merchandising would have long sightlines, so customers can see a lot of the store at once.
  • Ambience – Difficult to put your finger on, but this is the character of a store. Sensory information will combine to create this (I.e. sight, sound, smell, textures)
  • Proportional Merchandising –In simple terms, this is the technique of giving more space to your best sellers and less space to your poor sellers Knowing which items are most profitable, and assigning space to them in your store proportionate to their profitability.
  • Product Engagement – When your customer engages with a product, they pay it more attention, maybe by touching or picking it up. Increased product engagement will lead to increased sales.

For more information and advice on visual merchandising, please contact us. We are proud to be one of the independent visual merchandising companies with a wide ranging visual merchandising portfolio.

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Easter window dressing ideas

We have just the Valentine’s day behind and Easter is just around the corner.

Easter is certainly a colourful and buoyant time of the year for most retailers as the shoppers will be out and about with the warmer Spring weather. This is an opportunity you can to your advantage. Even if your merchandise is not directly related to the usual Easter goods, you can still use your shop window to your advantage and draw in some Easter shoppers.  If you are planning to catch the attention of Easter shoppers, here are a few interesting ideas for  your shop window dressing.

Pastels colours rule

Everybody associated the pastel colours with Easter. Pinks, light blues, greens and yellows remind us of Easter and the new life of spring. You can easily create an Easter feel in your shop front by using plenty of these pastel colours in your window display. First of all, get some ribbon and tissue paper in a range of pastel colours and use them to line the floor and back wall of your window. Next, you can place some of your merchandise in the foreground in strategically.

Eggs, eggs, eggs

Eggs are probably the single biggest symbol of Easter, and they can be a fun decoration to incorporate into your shop window display. You can pick up a few colourful Easter eggs and place them among the goods you are showcasing on your display tables and wall racks in your front window. In addition to the eggs, you can reinforce the Easter theme by purchasing a few stuffed chicks or baby rabbits as these animals are also associated with the holiday.

A spring in your step

If you are looking for a window display that you can leave up long after Easter has gone, then you may want to consider going for a more toned-down spring theme. One of the most exciting things about Easter is that it is the messenger of the new, warm season. So you can capitalise on the Spring theme by making an outdoors scene in your front window. You can make use of fake grass or gift wrap on the floor of the display. You can incorporate flowers, kites, bouquets of flowers or anything else you sell that reminds you of what makes spring such a fabulous season.

Needless to say that if these windows are not implemented in a coordinated way, they can look very tacky and cheap. As a result, they could actually put people off coming into your shop. If you would like some professional advice in shop window dressing, or if you are looking for a visual merchandising company, please contact VM Design.

VM Design can also provide bespoke visual merchandising training that is specifically tailored for your needs as well.

 

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3 Essential Point Of Purchase Marketing Ideas

Point of purchase marketing, commonly abbreviated as POP, utilizes in-store displays to convince customers to make a purchase of a particular brand. How can you use your point of purchase marketing to attract customers’ attention, or convince customers to make an impulse purchase at point of sale?

Several approaches can be used, but the most effective is to offer customers exhilaration and value. Just like any other marketing ideas, POP must be directed towards conveying a clear message to customers to persuade them to make purchases.

Rich attractive graphics

Customers are most attracted by visuals, therefore, when creating your materials for point of purchase marketing, consider using conspicuous colors, interactive graphics as well as modest messages. You may consider using rare shapes and quirky concepts. Make use of your creativity and make your material more appealing. This is for one sole purpose: for visitors and customers to see.

Proper positioning

The location of your POP material matters a lot as it is critical that the material be easily visible to customers and visitors, whether you put it on tables, in a marquee, at checkout stands or shelves. The effectiveness of the material is also as important as the positioning. It must have messages that are easy to read and comprehend.  The POP material will particularly be helpful when customers are making their buying decisions, therefore, ensure that they are easily accessible, for that matter, they should be at eye level.

Complementary to product line

Point of purchase marketing primarily serves the purpose of convincing customers to make impulse purchases, therefore, use of opportunities that are in line with your primary product should be given a close thought. For instance, if running a restaurant, entice customers with daily specials on tabletop displays, post images of mouth-watering snacks to complement the beverage menus for taverns, and other sorts of tricks for relevant businesses. These POP efforts should be reinforced with proper training of staff with ideas to convince customers to make purchases.

For further questions and advice on visual merchandising, please contact VM Design. We are a small visual merchandising company with a lot of expertise in visual merchandising and window dressing.

 

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Increasing budgets for Window Dressing

Nobody in the retail trade doubts that the visual merchandising tool can make a great impression. However, how much money to spend on the visual merchandising is a frequently asked question.

There are a lot of lessons to learn from the bigger players in the game as these companies have much bigger data to call upon and they have been experimenting with it for decades. One of these key leanings has to be about the visual merchandising and window dressing budgets.

From small boutique shops to nationwide chain stores, the budgets for visual merchandising and window dressing are “one of the best-kept secrets”. However, recent studies amongst the big retailers indicate a clear trend of increasing visual merchandising and window dressing budgets despite the recent financial pressures on the retail trade.

The window dressing budget accounts for approximately 2% of the overall marketing costs for the business that took part in the surveys. At the top end, the department stores, expectedly, spend significantly more than 2% of their marketing budget on window dressing.

Interestingly, though, the chain stores apportion slightly less than 2% of their marketing budget in the window dressing. The data suggest that this is because they spend more on their in-store presentations.

On the other end of the scale, the smaller retailers do not seem to have a fixed budget for window dressing.

Using just a fraction of the total marketing budget, the smaller retailers can have a powerful effect at a relatively low cost.

To discuss your visual merchandising and window dressing strategy, please contact VM design. We are a visual merchandising company that takes pride in providing the best service to our long-term clients.

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